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  • crimewatchrt 5:16 pm on September 17, 2010 Permalink |
    Tags: Arizona, Border, California, Cartel, , Customs, , Enforcement, , Gangs, Guns, ICE, Illegal immigrants, kidnappings, Mexico, , murder, New Mexico, , smuggling, Texas   

    Border Crime 

    On the Southwest Border banner

    Border Crime By the Numbers

    $1.1 Million Worth Of Drugs Stopped At Calexico Border

    US Customs and Border Protection ( CBP ) officers at the Calexico ports of entry made three significant drug seizures over the weekend.

    Sheriff Joe meets with extreme resistance at a school

    He also captures the TEA Party’s pro-Arpaio people who suggest that the Border Patrol should start “popping off” people as they cross the border,

    Covert Marijuana Growing Operation Foiled by US Border Patrol

    Temecula, California – Last week, United States Border Patrol agents eradicated 365 marijuana plants growing outdoors in a secluded canyon near Temecula,

    Family Fight, Border Patrol Raid, Baby Deported

    Ms. Castro, a fourth-generation American citizen, went to the local Border Patrol station. She said she would give the agents there information about the

    Agents seize $2.5 million worth of drugs in Starr County

    RIO GRANDE CITY — Border Patrol agents seized more than $2.5 million worth of marijuana over the weekend in Starr County. The first seizure occured near

    3 of 4 illegals caught after lengthy search

    One suspect is being charged by the US Border Patrol with human smuggling, police said. The suspects, identified by police as Hispanic men, were in a 2000

    Border Patrol confiscates half a ton of marijuana

    Border Patrol Agents confiscated more than half a ton of marijuana that was being transported in a trailer. LAREDO, Tx.- Border Patrol Agents confiscated

    A kidnapper's holding cell.

    Kidnappings Escalate

    Kidnappings by the cartels and the gangs who work for them have become a serious problem in several U.S. cities on the Southwest border. In the past, kidnap victims were usually rivals in the drug trade. Sometimes victims were kidnapped for revenge, sometimes to intimidate. And paying a ransom was no guarantee the victim would be released.

    But when the gangs realized how easy—and profitable—kidnapping could be, they started abducting anyone who looked wealthy enough to command a hefty ransom, and that included Americans on either side of the border.

    In the Texas border town of McAllen, for example, the rate of kidnapping has nearly quadrupled. Between October 2008 and September 2009, 42 people were kidnapped in the McAllen area, compared with 11 the previous year. And many kidnappings go unreported because the victims may be involved in illegal activity and don’t want to contact authorities.

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    ON THE SOUTHWEST BORDER
    Corruption, Drugs, Gangs, and More

    08/02/10

    The U.S. border with Mexico extends nearly 2,000 miles, from San Diego, California to Brownsville, Texas. At too many points along the way, criminals ply their trade with surprising ease and devastating results.

    Drug cartels transporting kilos of cocaine and marijuana, gangs who think nothing of kidnapping and murder, traffickers smuggling human cargo, corrupt public officials lining their pockets by looking the other way—any one of these offenses represents a challenge to law enforcement.

    Traffic - Video Play

    Taken together, they constitute a threat not only to the safety of our border communities, but to the security of the entire country.

    During the next several weeks, FBI.gov will take you to the Southwest border for a firsthand look at our efforts there to fight crime. We will take you to San Diego—home of the world’s busiest port of entry—and across the border into Tijuana. We will also visit El Paso, Texas, whose sister city in Mexico—Juarez—has become as deadly as any war zone thanks to the drug cartels.

    In articles, pictures, and video, we will chronicle the Bureau’s efforts to combat Southwest

    Kevin Perkins
    Assistant Director
    Kevin Perkins

    border crime through our participation in drug, violent crime, and public corruption task forces; our extensive intelligence-gathering efforts; and our vital partnerships with Mexican law enforcement.

    Despite our continuing successes, however, much work is left to be done.

    “With such a great expanse of territory to cover,” said Kevin Perkins, assistant director of our Criminal Investigative Division, “there are places where the border is permeable. In some areas of the desert, people can cross illegally at will, and they do. The U.S. government has built fences and other barriers that our adversaries are continually trying to defeat, and in some cases they are defeating them,” he added.  “Either they’re tunneling under, flying over, or actually cutting through the various defenses we’ve put up.”

    The cartels make billion-dollar profits trafficking drugs. Gaining and controlling border access is critical to their operations. They maintain that control through bribery, extortion, intimidation, and extreme violence. Some areas on the Mexican side of the border are so violent they are reminiscent of the gangster era of Chicago in the 1930s or the heyday of the Mafia’s Five Families in New York. In Tijuana, for example, a man who came to be known as “The Strew Maker”—El Pozolero—worked for one of the cartels dissolving hundreds of murder victims in acid to dispose of the evidence. In Juarez, decapitated heads of murdered cartel members have been displayed on fence posts to intimidate rivals.

    “We think al Qaeda is violent,” said one of our senior agents in El Paso, “but the cartels here are often just as willing to resort to extreme brutality and bloodshed to carry out their objectives.”

    The disturbing level of violence sometimes overshadows the national security risks along the border, Perkins said. “Unfortunately, there are border guards who are corrupt—people who can wave vehicles through checkpoints. Those vehicles could contain narcotics or illegal aliens, but they could also be pieces to the next dirty bomb brought into the country by terrorists. We are working very hard to make sure that doesn’t happen.”

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    CBP officer at border stop (play video)
    U.S. Customs and Border Protection officer Michael Gilliland is seen in surveillance video in 2006 waving cars through his lane at a border crossing in San Diego. He was arrested hours later. Video


    ON THE SOUTHWEST BORDER
    Public Corruption: A Few Bad Apples

    08/09/10

    In the surveillance footage taken hours before his arrest, U.S. Customs and Border Protection Officer Michael Gilliland can be seen nonchalantly waving a car through his lane at the Otay Mesa Port of Entry in San Diego. He was knowingly allowing illegal aliens across the border, and he would do this several more times throughout the evening. His actions that night would earn him nearly the equivalent of his annual salary—and eventually a five-year prison term.

    Gilliland, a former U.S. Marine and veteran Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officer with 16 years of experience, has been in jail since 2007. But his case continues to illustrate the pervasive problem of corruption along the Southwest border and the damage that can occur when officials betray the public’s trust.

    Although the vast majority of U.S. government employees working on the border are not corrupt, as one senior agent who investigates such crimes noted, “Even one bad apple is too many.”

    Of our 700 agents assigned to public corruption investigations nationwide, approximately 120 of them are located in the Southwest region. We work closely with many federal agencies, including CBP and the Drug Enforcement Administration. The result has been more than 400 public corruption cases originating from the Southwest region—and in the past fiscal year more than 100 arrests and about 130 state and federal cases prosecuted.

    We have 12 border corruption task forces in the Southwest, which consist of many state and local law enforcement agencies as well as our federal partners. Recently, we established a National Border Corruption Task Force at FBI Headquarters to coordinate the activities of all regional operations.

    At our Border Corruption Task Force office in San Diego, Special Agent Terry Reed—who headed the Michael Gilliland investigation—points out the “Wall of Shame.” Displayed are pictures of a dozen former officials convicted of public corruption offenses in the San Diego area. They are a diverse group of men and women from a variety of state and federal government agencies. They were all in it for the money, sex, or both—a fact not lost on the drug cartels.

    “The cartels have developed into very sophisticated businesses,” said El Paso Special Agent Tim Gutierrez. “Despite their brutality and violence, they use sophisticated tactics.”

    The cartels actively engage in corrupting public officials. They recruit by exploiting weaknesses, sometimes gaining intelligence through surveillance methods usually employed by law enforcement. Cartel members have been known to observe inspectors at ports of entry using binoculars from the Mexican side of the border. Maybe an inspector has a drinking or gambling problem. Maybe he flirts with women and could be tempted to cheat on his wife. Maybe an employee is simply burned out on the job.

    “If you’re an inspector and you are legitimately waving through 97 out of 100 cars anyway,” Gutierrez said, “and you realize you can make as much as your annual salary by letting the 98th car go by, it can be easy to rationalize that.”

    “The cartels are always looking for the next Michael Gilliland,” Agent Reed said. “But using our combined investigative and intelligence gathering skills, the task force has been very successful in rooting out corrupt public officials at the border.”

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    Mexico Border crossing
    The kidnappings, beatings, and murders that mark the drug-related violence of Mexican border cities like Tijuana and Juarez have increasingly spilled over the border.


    ON THE SOUTHWEST BORDER
    When Violence Hits Too Close to Home

    08/12/10

    Emerging from the port of entry’s administrative offices into a sunny San Diego morning, Special Agent Dean Giboney spoke in fluent Spanish with the man whose temporary U.S. visa he had just helped renew. The man was smiling, happy to be out of Mexico, even though he understood that being on U.S. soil was no guarantee of safety from the Tijuana drug cartel that has put a price on his head.

    The kidnappings, beatings, and murders that mark the extreme drug-related violence of Mexican border cities such as Tijuana and Juarez have increasingly spilled over the border. Agent Giboney is hoping the man—we’ll call him José —can provide information that will help in the Bureau’s efforts to dismantle the cartels and the criminal enterprises they fuel.

    A few years ago, José started working for the Arellano Felix Organization (AFO) in Tijuana to earn extra money. But when he saw how routine the act of murder was for the cartel—leaders thought nothing of having even their own people killed for real or perceived insubordination—he started to fear for his life and contacted the FBI to help him flee the country.

    Sources like José are just one of many ways the Bureau gathers intelligence to combat border crime. Agent Giboney is particularly interested in gaining information regarding fugitives in the Los Palillos case, one of San Diego’s most notorious examples of so-called “spillover violence.”

    Los Palillos—the “Toothpicks”—was a rogue spinoff from the AFO. From 2004 to 2007, the San Diego street gang carried out a brutal crime spree in which 13 people were abducted and nine were killed. Bodies turned up in cars, on jogging paths, and inside houses in quiet, residential neighborhoods.

    The group’s leader, Jorge Rojas-Lopez, is serving a life sentence without parole for the crimes, and several of his henchmen are also in prison. But five members of the gang are still at large.

    Rojas-Lopez—a former AFO member—was fighting the cartel for a piece of the billion-dollar drug trade, but he was also fighting for revenge, because the AFO had ordered the murder of his brother.

    “This level of extreme violence is very typical of the way the cartels operate south of the border,” Giboney said. Unfortunately, Los Palillos is not an isolated case north of the border, either.

    What explains this level of brutality? “The cartels and the gang members they employ want to be Al Pacino in the movie Scarface,” Giboney said. During raids on the homes of cartel members, he has seen movie posters of the machine-gun-wielding Pacino, who played a vicious drug kingpin. “They want to live that lifestyle—the nice cars, going out to clubs, throwing money around. But once you’re in that lifestyle,” he explained, “it’s hard to get out, even if you want to.”

    José understands how difficult it is to get away from the cartel. The “narcos,” as he calls AFO members, are powerful as well as ruthless, and their influence is felt at every level of Mexican society. “Whatever they want to know about you they can find out,” he said. “They will stop at nothing to protect their interests, even if it means crossing the border.”

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    Border liaisons Mike Eckel, Alejandro Lares
    FBI Special Agent Mike Eckel, left, is one of the Bureau’s five border liaison officers. He meets about once a week with counterparts like Alejandro Lares of the Tijuana Police Department.


    ON THE SOUTHWEST BORDER
    Forging Ties in Tijuana

    08/16/10

    Amid the car horns, engine exhaust, and constant flow of people on foot and in cars, Special Agent Mike Eckel inched through traffic at the San Ysidro Port of Entry—the world’s busiest land border crossing—on his way from San Diego to Tijuana. Although the Mexican city can be a dangerous place for Americans, in his role as one of the Bureau’s five border liaison officers, Eckel makes the trip about once a week.

    Alejandro Lares (Play Video)

    On this day, he will visit his counterpart at the Tijuana Police Department in hopes of locating a U.S. citizen wanted for a 2009 murder in Nevada who may be hiding with relatives in that region of Mexico.

    “The idea behind the border liaison program is to build relationships and to exchange information with Mexican law enforcement,” said Eckel, who speaks fluent Spanish. “We try to take geography out of the equation so we can share intelligence and help each other and bring criminals to justice on both sides of the border.”

    In the past, such relationships were difficult to cultivate in Tijuana because of the level of corruption there, according to U.S. and Mexican officials. “But the tide is turning,” Eckel said. “There is less corruption now, and the FBI and other federal entities have established solid working relationships with our Mexican partners.”

    Less than an hour after crossing the border, Eckel sat in a small office in a busy Tijuana police substation. He was speaking with officer Alejandro Lares about the Nevada murder fugitive and other matters, including suspected cartel members who live freely in San Diego, where they have committed no crimes. Lares, who has been on the Tijuana force for four years, has served as the liaison officer for U.S. law enforcement for the past year.

    “Today, the cartels have less power than they had in the past,” Lares said, largely because the Mexican federal government has exerted its military presence in the area. “We are moving in the right direction,” he added, but acknowledged that the crime and corruption associated with the drug trade will never disappear completely.

    Thanks to drug money, the cartels have enormous power—and they use it to bribe, intimidate, and murder. To get what they want from police and government officials in Tijuana and elsewhere along the Mexican border, the cartels offer “the silver or the lead”: the silver being money and the lead being bullets.

    Even well-intentioned public servants who refuse outright bribes might be compelled to look the other way if their lives—or the lives of their families—have been threatened. “And these are not hollow threats,” Eckel said. “They will kill you.”

    But efforts such as the border liaison program and the determined, collaborative work of law enforcement on both sides of the border are making a difference.

    “Sharing information is the key,” Eckel said. “By being able to gather intelligence and quickly analyze and share it, we can actually save lives. I have seen that happen.” Working with the Mexicans as well as other U.S. partner agencies, he added, “We help keep each other safe. We all get along extremely well, because our lives can depend on it.”

    *********************************************************************

    Drug smuggling
    A vanload of drugs confiscated near the border.


    ON THE SOUTHWEST BORDER
    A Drug Buy in El Paso

    08/30/10

    It may look like any other afternoon along this busy shopping strip outside El Paso, Texas, with people walking in and out of stores and restaurants and traffic moving at a steady clip. But inside a particular establishment, one of our sources is waiting to buy nearly $20,000 worth of cocaine from a local gang member.

    The operation represents one of the many ways we are fighting the drug trade along the Southwest border. From small street-level drug buys to major cases targeting the highest levels of cartel and gang leadership, our agents and law enforcement partners attack the problem from every angle to gain intelligence and to disrupt and dismantle trafficking organizations.

    On this day, agents from our criminal enterprise/gang squad are working with local and state officers to build a case against the gang. Members of the team—all in plain clothes and driving unmarked vehicles—are inconspicuously and strategically parked near the site of the establishment. The source inside is wearing a wire, and his conversations can be heard on car-to-car radios. If anything goes wrong, the source will say a code word and the team will quickly be inside.

    At a final briefing before the operation began, the team leader—one of our veteran agents—spoke to the group in a parking lot behind a nearby municipal building. He went over the plan again in detail, stressing the danger involved and the need for extreme caution to make sure everyone stayed safe. Then, like a basketball coach before a game, he gathered the team in a circle and read aloud the Bureau’s policy on the use of deadly force.

    An hour later, the source was inside, but the target wasn’t—he called to say he would be late. While they waited in their car and listened to the radio chatter, two of our agents on the operation—we’ll call them Smith and Johns—explained the economics of the drug trade in El Paso and across the border in Juarez.

    “Where you have gangs,” Smith said, “you have drugs. And in El Paso, all the drugs are coming from across the border.” A kilo of cocaine in El Paso costs about $20,000, but can be sold in Chicago, Atlanta, New York, or Miami for more than $30,000. There is a lot of money to be made.

    Finally, the target arrived, but without any drugs and only vague promises to produce them that day. The team leader sent a text message to the source to leave, and then canceled the operation. “We’ll try again tomorrow,” he said.

    False starts and dead ends are typical in such drug cases, Agents Smith and Johns said later. But the work is important. Even though small drug buys won’t break the backs of the cartels, Johns explained, “We gain a lot of intelligence from these operations, and sometimes we develop new sources as a result. And every kilo of coke we take off the streets is one that doesn’t make its way to American kids.”

    *********************************************************************

    Confiscated drugs
    Methamphetamine confiscated near the border. Photo courtesy of DEA


    ON THE SOUTHWEST BORDER
    Going After the Major Players

    09/08/10

    Methamphetamine, marijuana, cocaine, and cash—the amount of drugs and currency crossing the border in and around El Paso, Texas can be difficult to comprehend.

    “El Paso may be the busiest city in the world in terms of the flow of drugs,” said Special Agent Mike Cordero, a member of the FBI/DEA Strike Force, an investigative team established in 2007 to target “the biggest of the big” drug trafficking organizations.

    “If they are major players,” Agent Cordero explained, “we’re going after them. Our mission is to disrupt and dismantle these organizations.”

    It is estimated that 40-60 percent of all illegal drugs that come into the U.S. enter through the border areas encompassed by our El Paso Field Office. The drugs flow across the border from Juarez, and U.S. currency flows back into Mexico. Every month, tens of millions of dollars in cash pass into Juarez, enabling the cartels to corrupt public officials, purchase weapons, and engage in other criminal activity beyond drug trafficking.

    The strike force in El Paso—one of several along the Southwest border—is designed to fight this cycle of crime and violence. The program is funded by the Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force, a longstanding Department of Justice initiative that combines federal, state, and local law enforcement efforts to fight organized crime and drug traffickers. The Drug Enforcement Administration and the FBI have lead roles in operating the strike force.

    Working with undercover operatives, sources, and Mexican law enforcement, the team uses an intelligence-driven approach in its investigations. Besides orchestrating large drug buys, agents pay close attention to the money laundering aspects of drug trafficking. Perhaps most importantly, the actionable intelligence gathered by the strike force benefits many other investigations and law enforcement agencies both domestically and internationally.

    The El Paso strike force consists of 10 FBI agents and 10 DEA agents, as well as representatives from the Internal Revenue Service and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives.

    “We are a badge-less operation,” Agent Cordero said. “When you walk in our office, you can’t tell who is FBI and who is DEA. There is a concerted effort to put the cases first and not to worry about who gets the credit,” he added. “A win is a win for everybody.”

    Recently, during a nationwide drug trafficking takedown called Project Deliverance, the strike force arrested 133 individuals on drug charges and seized 800 pounds of marijuana, 11 kilos of cocaine, and nearly $140,000 in cash. The operation also contributed intelligence to numerous other investigations around the country. “Because El Paso is a pivotal location for the Mexican drug trade,” said Special Agent Raul Bujanda, another member of the strike force, “the intelligence we gather allows us to spin off a lot of cases to other offices.”

    Drugs in car body
    Twelve pounds of heroin confiscated during Project Deliverance. Photo courtesy of DEA

    “We’re very proud of the work we do,” Agent Cordero said. “There are no egos involved in the strike force—it’s all about the cases and bringing down the drug traffickers.”

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  • crimewatchrt 2:58 am on November 29, 2009 Permalink |
    Tags: Charles Glen Reep, , , lawsuit, Leroy Barnes Jr, Michael Alvarado, , murder, , , , shot, taser, wrongful death   

    Wrongful Death’s By Police 

     

    Family of mentally ill man files federal wrongful-death lawsuit 

    Jun 29, 2013 – The family of a mentally ill man filed a wrongful death lawsuit in federal court Friday claiming three officers, despite knowing the man was 

    Culpeper judge upholds claim against police chief in Cook wrongful 

    Jul 31, 2013 – A judge ruled Monday that a valid claim had been stated against the Culpeper Police Chief in the $5 million wrongful death suit being pursued 

    Wrongful death suit filed against Redding police for June 2012 fatal 

    Aug 12, 2013 – The family of a 19-year-old man shot and killed by Reddingpolice last year has filed a wrongful death suit against the city, police Chief Rob 

    Parents of 16-year-old boy shot by police plan to file 

    May 8, 2013 – A 16-year-old boy shot by police in Brooklyn two months ago lay mortally wounded on the ground for 15 minutes before getting medical 
    Jun 4, 2013 – Brandon Dunbar was fleeing police in March 2012 when he was shot; attorney alleges cover-up, indifference to injury.

    Culosi wrongful death trial against Officer Deval V. Bullock set for Jan

    Five years after optometrist Salvatore J. Culosi was shot to death outside his home by a Fairfax County police officer, that officer will go on trial in January, to face a wrongful death civil suit filed by Culosi’s parents,

    Parents sue Capitol Police in shooting

    The parents of a Fort Washington man shot and killed by police just blocks from the US Capitol in July 2009 have filed a wrongful death suit in federal …

    Houston Police Use Innocent Citizens as Human Shield in Road Blockade

    Sep 6, 2010‎ Michael Callahan and The Callahan Law Firm represent people throughout the state of Texas in serious injury and wrongful death cases. …

    Pasadena officers in Barnes’ shooting named in federal court papers

    Sep 3, 2010‎ The officers were identified as Police Officer No. 1 and Police Officer No. 2, in a wrongful death lawsuit filed last year. On Wednesday federal court …

    Court papers identify Pasadena officers who shot and killed parolee

    Sep 2, 2010‎ Papers in a wrongful-death suit name Charles Glen Reep and Michael Alvarado as the policemen who fatally shot Leroy Barnes Jr. in 2009 during a traffic stop …


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    Mesa Police Department Settles Wrongful Death Lawsuit in Police Shooting for $3,000,000.00 after 15 year old Mario Madrigal threatened suicide with a knife. Police storm house, taser him once, and then 3 officers shoot him 10 times killing him

    Wrongful Death, Family awarded $1.2 million settlement after Anthony Scott had left a birthday party to buy candles and cigarettes at a gas station, confronted by police, asked to step out of the vehicle and was shot twice because it appeared he was trying to reach for a weapon in his lap.

    Illinois Wrongful Death Lawsuit Settled by Police Over Excessive Taser Use. Although Roger Holyfield was unarmed, handcuffed and laying facedown on the ground, the officers reportedly shot him with a Taser several times resulting in his death.

    Taser Lawsuit Settled for $2.4M and Police Will Suspend Stun Gun Use over the death of Stanley Harlan, who was struck with a Taser three times for resisting attempts to handcuff him following a stop for suspected drunk driving

    City Settles WrongfulDeath Lawsuit for Police Shooting after victim was shot in the back by a police sniper on Nov. 4, 2005, while he was talking on a cell phone

    Indiana Police Settle Wrongful Death Suit Over Police Crash. Police agreed to pay man $75,000 after his fiancee was killed and he was seriously injured when a driver fleeing police crashed into his car.

    Shelby Township police settle $1.95 million wrongful death of man who was being apprehended for running in traffic in his underwear. Victim was struck repeatedly by police with Tasers and beaten, he was then suffocated to death while police were restraining him

    Wrongful Death Lawsuit in Police Shooting Settled after man was was fatally shot in the back of the head by trooper during a police pursuit.

    $1.2 Million Wrongful Death, Police Shooting, jury verdict on behalf of a mother whose schizophrenic son was shot 14 times and killed by police

    Family Files Wrongful Death Suit Over Police Chase That Ended in Fatality of a Billings nurse killed by a drunken teenager who was fleeing from police

    New Jersey family settles $1.35 million police wrongful death lawsuit after police officer fatally shot the victim six times during a confrontation in the man’s apartment

    WrongfulDeath Suit Filed in Police Beating of mentally disabled man who died when he was shot, handcuffed, then beat at least a dozen times by Charleston police

    Wrongful death suit against Epping Police continues dispite a request to dismiss the case brought against the Epping Police Department by the family of murdered man

    Wrongful Death Suit Settled Against Chattanooga Police, after victim that suffered fractured ribs, a dislocated shoulder joint with a fracture and multiple abrasions in the arrest, died from positional asphyxia

     
  • crimewatchrt 5:52 pm on November 14, 2009 Permalink |
    Tags: clues, death, Homicide, murder, ,   

    Unsolved Murders 

    MURDER VICTIMS JENNINGS, LOUISIANA AREA

    The Wanted by FBI New Orleans page has been updated to include a poster seeking information regarding the murders of eight women; Loretta Lynn Chaisson Lewis, Ernestine Daniels Patterson, Kristen E. Gary Lopez, Whitnei Charlene Dubois, Laconia Shontell Brown, Crystal Shay Benoit Zeno, Brittney Gary and Necole Jean Guillory. The victims, who range in age from 17 to 30 years old, were found deceased in and around the Jennings, Louisiana area from May 2005 through August 2009.

    THE DETAILS SURROUNDING THE CRIMES

    A Multi-Agency Investigative Team led by the Jefferson Davis Parish Sheriff’s Office located in Jennings, Louisiana, is seeking information regarding the murders of eight women; Loretta Lynn Chaisson Lewis, Ernestine Daniels Patterson, Kristen E. Gary Lopez, Whitnei Charlene Dubois, Laconia Shontell Brown, Crystal Shay Benoit Zeno, Brittney Gary and Necole Jean Guillory. The victims, who range in age from 17 to 30 years old, were found deceased in and around the Jennings, Louisiana area from May 2005 through August 2009.

    For additional information relating to these crimes/cases, please see Crimes in Jefferson Davis Parish at http://www.jeffdaviscrimes.net.

    Everett Jackson, Age 39
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    Case: S-08-48614
    Occured on: 2008-09-14Case Information:
    Mr. Jackson’s torso was found floating in the Ocklawaha River, near the Sharpe’s Ferry Bridge. His vehicle was found abandoned in the City of Ocala.
    Benjamin Carroll, Age 24
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    Case: S-08-116
    Occured on: 2008-01-01Case Information:
    Benjamin Carroll was stabbed during a Home Invasion Robbery at 6800 NW Gainesville Rd. Lot #40. Two B/M suspects are responsible. The Homicide is believed to be drug related.
    Derrick Wilcoxen, Age 41
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    Case: S-07-41062
    Occured on: 2007-08-10Case Information:
    Derrick Wilcoxen was stabbed to death in his white and maroon colored Ford Econoline van in Marion Oaks at approximately 7:45 p.m. He was with H/M Angel Molina and B/M Kenneth Phillips (AKA “Casino”) at the time of his death.
    Aliisa Gehring, Age 30
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    Case: S-06-55983
    Occured on: 2006-11-19Case Information:
    Aliisa Gehring was shot and killed at her home at 3614 SE 33rd Ave. Ocala, Fl. during an alleged Home Invasion Robbery by a black male suspect. She had just returned home from work at Club Zanzabar in the Pine Plaza. Her boyfriend, Josh Scarbrough, was also shot during the incident.
    Javier Huerta, Age 20
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    Case: S-06-54530
    Occured on: 2006-11-06Case Information:
    Javier Huerta and Gustavo Olivares-Rivas were found near the Marion-Lake County line on Highway 19 just North of SR 40 East. Both victims were found inside a black in color 2006 Nissan Titan 4 door pick up. Javier Huerta and Gustavo Olivares-Rivas were shot multiple times. Javier Huerta and Gustavo Olivares-Rivas were working in the Deland area in construction and lived in Pierson, Fl.
    Gustavo Olivares-Rivas, Age 28
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    Case: S-06-54530
    Occured on: 2006-11-06Case Information:
    Gustavo Olivares-Rivas and Javier Huerta were found near the Marion-Lake County line on Highway 19 just North of SR 40 East. Both victims were found inside a black in color 2006 Nissan Titan 4 door pick up. Gustavo Olivares-Rivas and Javier Huerta were shot multiple times. Gustavo Olivares-Rivas and Javier Huerta were working in the Deland area in construction and lived in Pierson, Fl.
    Margaret Mohrenne, Age 33
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    Case: S-05-38103
    Occured on: 2005-07-17Case Information:
    Margaret Mohrenne was found murdered in her home at 3612 NE 22 Ct. Ocala, Fl. after a fire was discovered by a passerby. Margaret Mohrenne died from blunt trauma injuries. Ms. Mohrenne was a home health care nurse at the time of her Murder.
    Patricia Sofia, Age 51
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    Case: S-05-2251
    Occured on: 2005-01-12Case Information:
    Patricia Sofia was found shot to death in her residence at 11231 SE 40th Ave. Belleview, Fl. Patricia Sofia worked for Wal-Mart in Silver Springs at the time of her Murder.
    James Frazier Sr., Age 45
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    Case: S-04-71775
    Occured on: 2004-12-21Case Information:
    James Frazier Sr. was Found Murdered on the side of the road in the 15800 block of NW 51 Ave. in Reddick, Fl. He was shot to death.
    Eileen Gaffney, Age 84
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    Case: S-04-50166
    Occured on: 2004-09-02Case Information:
    Eileen Gaffney was found Murdered at her residence at 3901 SE 44th St. She was found in her pool and died from blunt trauma injuries. She was retired at the time of her Murder.
    May Craft, Age 21
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    Case: S-03-26014
    Occured on: 2003-07-05Case Information:
    May Craft was found laying beside the road deceased at 5299 NE 97 St. Rd. in Anthony, Fl. She lived at the Shangri La Motel in Ocala, Fl. at the time of her death.
    Maurice White, Age 36
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    Case: S-00-3195
    Occured on: 2000-01-24Case Information:
    Maurice White was shot to death in his mobile home at 16746 NE 22nd Terrace Citra, Fl. during an alleged Home Invasion Robbery.
    Roberta Johnson, Age 38
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    Case: S-99-13425
    Occured on: 1999-04-26Case Information:
    Roberta Johnson was last spoken to around 04-24-99. Her vehicle was located at the Winn Dixie at NW 44th Ave. and Hwy 27 abandoned. On 04-26-99 Her body was located in a shallow grave in the 6400 Block of NW 44th Ave. She was 9 months pregnant at the time of her Murder.
    Samuel Rittenhouse III, Age 63
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    Case: S-96-24031
    Occured on: 1996-07-26Case Information:
    Samuel Rittenhouse was found Murdered in a wooded area near SE 3rd St. off of CR 475 in Ocala, Fl. He died from blunt trauma injuries. His white in color 1988 Dodge van was stolen and later recovered in Williston, Fl.
    Susie Dwyer, Age 28
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    Case: S-96-23030
    Occured on: 1996-07-17Case Information:
    Susie Dwyer was reported missing from Gainesville, Fl. Her remains were found in the underbrush at CR 329 and NE 47th Ave. in Sparr, Fl.
    Jorge Sulsona-Maitin, Age 61
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    Case: S-95-39694
    Occured on: 1995-12-19Case Information:
    Jorge Sulsona-Maitin was found shot to death in a secluded area near Bay Pass and Guava Pass in Ocklawaha, Fl. He was found near his blue in color Cadillac. Jorge Sulsona-Maitin was retired at the time of his Murder.
    Robert Dlugoborski, Age 34
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    Case: S-94-16473
    Occured on: 1994-06-13Case Information:
    Robert Dlugoborski was found shot to death in his 1989 white in color Ford F250 truck in front of Associated Fruit Packers at 1180 SE 114 St. Rd. in Ocklawaha, Fl.
    Maxine Vogel, Age 63
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    Case: S-93-22924
    Occured on: 1993-08-05Case Information:
    Maxine Vogel was located outside her residence at 16300 SE 80th Ave. Summerfield, Fl. after her mobile home was set on fire. Maxine Vogel died from blunt trauma injuries. She operated a greyhound kennel and had more than 80 greyhounds there at the time of her Murder. The fire was discovered at about 1:00 AM and was the result of an Arson.
    James Holland, Age 57
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    Case: S-92-18394
    Occured on: 1992-07-18Case Information:
    James Holland was found shot to death in his home at 6800 NW 115 Ave. Ocala, Fl.
    Douglas Giddens, Age 46
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    Case: S-90-9381
    Occured on: 1990-04-06Case Information:
    Douglas Giddens was located shot to death in the 300 block of NE 33rd street in Ocala, Fl.
    Jose Garcia, Age 25
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    Case: S-87-70774
    Occured on: 1987-11-27Case Information:
    Jose Garcia’s decomposed remains were found in the Ocala National Forest on the Ocala Trail in Salt Springs. He was here on a hunting trip from Miami, Fl. He was shot to death.
    Gayle Beall, Age 32
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    Case: S-83-35745
    Occured on: 1983-12-09Case Information:
    Gayle Beall was last seen at a bar in Ocklawaha leaving with an unknown white male. Her remains were discovered in a field at Juniper Loop Court and Juniper Loop Circle in Silver Springs Shores. She was stabbed multiple times. An artist’s sketch of the suspect is available. Gayle Beall worked at a local horse farm at the time of her Murder.
    Wanda Faye Baldwin, Age 20
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    Case: S-83-35576
    Occured on: 1983-12-07Case Information:
    Wanda Faye Baldwin was found murdered in her home at 28476 SE CR42 in Umatilla, Fl. She died from blunt force trauma.
     
  • crimewatchrt 6:36 am on October 26, 2009 Permalink |
    Tags: bookmaking, capo, , crime boss, crime family, extortion, gangster, hitman, labor, loan sharking, mafia, mob, mobster, murder, murder inc., notorious, organized crime, racketeering, underboss, witness protection, witness tampering   

    Famous Gangsters And Mobsters 

    John Gotti
    John Gotti

    Mug Shot

    John Joseph Gotti, Jr. (October 27, 1940 – June 10, 2002) was a boss of the Gambino Crime Family, one of the Five Families in New York City.

    Early Years
    Gotti was involved in street gangs until he began working for the Gambino family in the 60s, fencing stolen goods and hijacking cargo from Northwest and United airlines.

    ___________________________________________________

    Joe Adonis
    American crime-syndicate boss in New York and New Jersey

    Police Photo

    Joe Adonis (November 22, 1902 – November 26, 1971) moved from Naples to New York as a child. In the 1920s he began working for Lucky Luciano and participated in the assassin of crime leader, Giuseppe Masseria. With Maseria out of the way, Luciano’s power in organized crime grew and Adonis became a rackets boss.

    After being convicted of gambling in 1951, Adonis was sent to prison then later deported to Italy when the authorities discovered he was an illegal alien.

    ___________________________________________________

    Albert Anastasia
    New York Cosa Nostra Boss

    Mug Shot

    Albert Anastasia, born Umberto Anastasio, (September 26, 1902 – October 25, 1957) was a Gambino crime family boss in New York known best for his role in running the contract killing gang known as Murder, Inc.

    ___________________________________________________

    Liborio Bellomo
    Liborio “Barney” Bellomo

    Mug Shot

    Liborio “Barney” Bellomo (b. January 8, 1957) became a Genovese capo in his 30s and grew quickly to acting boss of the Genovese crime family of New York after Vincent “the Chin” Gigante was indicted on racketeering in 1990.

    By 1996, Bellomo was facing charges for racketeering, murder and extortion and sentenced to 10 years in prison. He was indicted again for money laundering in 2001 and another four years was added to his prison time.

    Due out in 2008, Bellomo again faced racketeering and was indicted along with six other wiseguys on racketeering, extortion, money laundering and for his involvement in the 1998 murder of Genovese capo Ralph Coppola. Bellomo agreed to a plea bargain and received a year and a day longer on his sentence. He is scheduled to be released in 2009.

    ___________________________________________________

    Otto
    Abbadabba at age 15

    Mug Shot

    Otto “Abbadabba” Berman was known for his mathematical skills and became the accountant and advisor for gangster Dutch Schultz. He was killed by gunmen hired by Lucky Luciano at the Palace Chophouse tavern in Newark, N.J. in 1935.

    This mug shot was taken when he was 15 and arrested for attempted rape, but found not guilty. The next photo was taken in 1935, months before his death.

    ___________________________________________________

    Joe Bonanno
    Joe Bonanno

    Mug Shot

    Giuseppe Bonanno (January 18, 1905 – May 12, 2002) was a Sicilian-born American organized crime figure who became the boss of the Bonanno crime family in 1931 until his retirement in 1968. Bonanno was instrumental in forming The Mafia Commission, which was designed to oversee all Mafia activities in the U.S. and serve to resolve conflicts between the Mafia families.

    Bonanno was never imprisoned until after he stepped down as the Bonanno family boss. During the 1980s he was sent to prison for obstructing justice and for contempt of court. He died in 2002, at the age of 97.

    ___________________________________________________

    Louis
    Only
    Mob Boss to Be Executed

    Mug Shot

    Louis “Lepke” Buchalter (Feb. 6, 1897 to March 4, 1944) became the administrative head of “Murder, Incorporated” a group formed to carry out murders for the Mafia. In March of 1940, he was sentenced to a term of 30 years to life for racketeering. He was sent to Leavenworth Penitentiary in April 1940, but was later sentenced to death after Murder Inc. killer Abe “Kid Twist” Reles cooperated with prosecutors in convicting Lepke of murder.

    He died in the electric chair at Sing Sing Prison on March 4, 1944.

    __________________________________________________

    Tommaso Buscetta
    Mafia Turncoat

    Mug Shot

    Tommaso Buscetta (Palermo, July 13, 1928- New York, April 2, 2000) was one of the first members of the Sicilian Mafia that broke the code of silence and helped authorities prosecute hundreds of Mafia members both in Italy and the U.S. In return for his many testimonies he was allowed to live in the U.S. and was placed in the Witness Protection Program. He died of cancer in 2000.

    ___________________________________________________

    Giuseppe Calicchio
    Giuseppe Calicchio

    Mug Shot

    In 1909, Giuseppe Calicchio, an immigrant from Naples, began work for the Morello gang in Highland, New York as a printer and engraver of counterfeit Canadian and US currency. In 1910, the printing plant was raided and Calicchio along with his boss Giuseppe Morello and 12 other gang members were arrested. Calicchio received 17 years hard labor and a $600 fine, but was released in 1915.

    ___________________________________________________

    Al Capone
    Scarface

    Mug Shot

    Alphonse Gabriel Capone (January 17, 1899 – January 25, 1947), was an Italian American gangster who became the boss of the criminal organization known as The Chicago Outfit. He made a fortune in bootleg liquor during Prohibition.

    His reputation as a ruthless rival in Chicago was solidified after the St. Valentine’s Day Massacre on February 14, 1929, when seven members of the “Bugs” Moran mob were machine-gunned against a garage wall by rivals posing as police.

    Capone’s rule over Chicago was stopped in 1931 when he was sent to prison for tax evasion. After his release he was hospitalized for dementia as a result of having advanced syphilis. His years as a mobster were over. Capone died in his house in Florida, never returning to Chicago after his release from prison.

    ___________________________________________________

    Paul Castellano
    Paul Castellano

    Mug Shot

    Paul Castellano (June 26, 1915 – December 16, 1985) was the head of the Gambino crime family in New York in 1973 after the death of Carlo Gambino. In 1983 the F.B.I. wired Castellano’s house and obtained over 600 hours of Castellano discussing mob business.

    Because of the tapes Castellano was arrested for ordering the murders of 24 people and was freed on bail. Just months later he and several crime family bosses were arrested based on information from the tapes in what became known as the Mafia Commission Trial, designed to connect Mafia mobsters to the construction business.

    It is believed by many that John Gotti hated Castellano and ordered his murder which was carried out on Dec. 16, 1985, outside Sparks Steak House in Manhattan.

    ___________________________________________________

    Antonio Cecala
    Antonio Cecala

    Mug Shot

    In 1908, Antonio Cecala was a counterfeiter working for Giuseppe Morello. His career was short lived after he was convicted in 1909 of conterfeiting and sentenced to 15 years and a $1,000 fine.

    ___________________________________________________

    Frank Costello
    Prime Minister of the Underworld

    Mug Shot

    Frank Costello, head of the Luciano crime family between 1936 and 1957, was one of the most powerful Mafia bosses in U.S. history. He had control over much of the gambling and bootlegging activities across the country and had gained more political influence than any other Mafia figure. As a leader of what authorities referred to as the “Rolls-Royce of organized crime”, Costello preferred to lead with his brain rather than muscle.

    ___________________________________________________

    Michael DeLeonardo
    Michael DeLeonardo

    Mug Shot

    Michael “Mickey Scars” DeLeonardo (b. 1955) was a New York gangster who at one time was a captain for the Gambino crime family. In 2002 he had a falling out with the Family boss, Peter Gotti, for hiding family money. Also in 2002 he was indicted on labor racketeering, extortion, loan sharking, witness tampering, and the murders of Gambino associate Frank Hydell and Fred Weiss.

    After a failed suicide attempt, DeLeonardo decided to go into the Witness Protection Program and provided the federal government with damaging testimony against Peter Gotti, Anthony “Sonny” Ciccone, Louis “Big Lou” Vallario, Frank Fappiano, Richard V. Gotti, Richard G. Gotti, and Michael Yanotti, John Gotti, Jr., Alphonse “Allie Boy” Persico and underboss John “Jackie” DeRoss.

    ___________________________________________________

    Thomas Eboli
    Thomas Eboli

    Mug Shot

    Thomas “Tommy Ryan” Eboli (b. June 13, 1911 – July 16, 1972) was a New York City mobster, known for being the acting boss of the Genovese crime family from 1960 through 1969. Eboli was murdered in 1972, allegedly after he was unable to repay Carlo Gambino $4 million dollars he had borrowed for a drug deal, much of which authorities seized in a raid.

    ___________________________________________________

    Benjamin Fein
    American Gangster

    Mug Shot

    Benjamin Fein was born in New York City in 1889. He grew up in a poor neighborhood on the Lower East Side and participated in gang activity most of his life. As a child he was a petty thief and as an adult he became a notorius gangster who dominated New York labor racketeering in the 1910s.

    ___________________________________________________

    Gaetano
    Boss for the Lucchese crime family

    Mug Shop

    Gaetano “Tommy” Gagliano (1884 – 16 February 1951) served as a low-profile Mafia boss for the Lucchese crime family, one of the most notorious “Five Families” in New York. He served for 20 years before turning the leadership over to Underboss, Gaetano “Tommy” Lucchese in 1951.

    ___________________________________________________

    Carlo Gambino
    Carlo Gambino

    Mug Shots

    Carlo Gambino came from Sicily in 1921 at the age of 19. A seasoned gang member, he immediately began his growth up the New York Mafia ladder. He worked in gangs led by Joe “the Boss” Masseria, Salvatore Maranzano, Philip and Vincent Mangano, and Albert Anastasia. After the murder of Anatasia in 1957, Gambino became the head of the family, and changed the name of the organization from D’Aquila to Gambino. Known as the Boss of Bosses, Carlo Gambino grew to be one of the most powerful Mafia bosses of all time. He died of heart failure at age 74 in 1976.

    ___________________________________________________

    Vito Genovese
    Vito Genovese (November 27, 1897 – February 14, 1969)

    Mug Shot

    Vito Genovese rose from the Lower East Side gangs as a teen to becoming the boss of the Genovese crime family. His 40-year relationship with Charlie “Lucky” Luciano gained him the position as Luciano’s underboss in 1931. Had it not been for murder charges which sent Genovese into hiding in Italy, he would have most likely taken over as head of the family when Lucia was sent to prison in 1936. It was not until his return to the U.S. and after key Mafia players were killed, that Genovese would become “Don Vito” the powerful boss of the Genovese family.

    ___________________________________________________

    Vincent GiganteVincent Gigante

    Mug Shot

    Vincent “The Chin” Gigante (March 29, 1928 – December 19, 2005) went from the boxing ring to a New York mobster who headed the Genovese crime family.

    Dubbed “the Oddfather,” by the press, Gigante faked mental illness in order to avoid prosecution. He was often seen wondering Greenwich Village in New York City in his bathrobe and slippers, mumbling incoherently to himself.

    The act helped him avoid prosecution for his crimes until 1997 when he was convicted of racketeering and conspiracy charges. He was sentenced to 12 years in prison, but had an additional three years added on when he pleaded guilty to faking his mental illness. Gigante died in prison in 2005.

    ___________________________________________________

    John Gotti
    John Gotti

    Mug Shots

    By age 31, Gotti was an acting capo for the Gambino family. Against the rules of the family, Gotti and his crew were dealing in heroin. When it was found out, family boss Paul Castellano wanted the crew broken up and possibly killed. Instead, Gotti and others organized the killing of Castellano who was shot six times in a Manhattan restaurant. Gotti then took over as the Gambino family boss and remained so until his death in 2002.

    ___________________________________________________

    John
    John “Junior” Gotti

    Mug Shot

    John Angelo Gotti (born February 14, 1964) is the son of the now deceased Gambino crime boss John Gotti. Allegedly Junior Gotti was a capo in the Gambino family and was the acting boss when during times his father was in prison. In 1999 Junior Gotti was arrested and found guilty on racketeering charges and was sentenced to six years in prison.

    ___________________________________________________

    Salvatore Gravano
    Salvatore Gravano

    Mug Shot

    Salvatore “Sammy the Bull” Gravano (born March 12, 1945) became an Underboss of the Gambino crime family after teaming up with John Gotti in planning and executing the murder of Paul Castellano, the then-Gambino boss. After Castellano’s murder, Gotti moved into the top position and Gravano moved in as his Underboss.

    In 1991, a F.B.I. investigation led to the arrest of several key players in the Gambino family including Gotti and Gravano. Looking at a long prison sentence, Gravano became a government witness in exchange for a lighter sentence. His testimony against Gotti, which included admitting to their taking part in 19 murders, resulted in a conviction and life sentence for John Gotti.

    His nickname “Sammy the Bull” quickly changed to “King Rat” among his peers after his testimony. For awhile he was in the U.S. protection program, but left it in 1995.

    After leaving the U.S. federal Witness Protection Program in 1995, Gravano moved to Arizona and started trafficking in ecstasy. In 2000, he was arrested and convicted of drug trafficking and received a 19-year sentence. His son was also convicted for his participation in the ecstasy drug ring.

    ___________________________________________________

    Henry Hill
    Henry Hill

    1980 F.B.I. Mug Shot

    Henry Hill grew up in Brooklyn, New York and at an early age ran errands for the local Lucchese crime family.

    Being of Italian and Irish decent, Hill was never “made” into the crime family, but was a soldier of capo, Paul Vario, and participated in hijacking trucks, loan sharking, bookmaking and took part in the infamous 1978 Lufthansa Air heist.

    After Hill’s close friend Tommy DeSimone vanished and he ignored warnings from his associates to stop dealing drugs, Hill became paranoid that he would soon be killed and became an F.B.I. informant. His testimony aided in the conviction of 50 criminals.

    ___________________________________________________

    Meyer Lansky
    Meyer Lansky

    Mug Shot

    Meyer Lansky (born Majer Suchowlinski, July 4, 1902 – January 15, 1983) was a major figure in organized crime in the U.S. Referred to often as the “Godfather of Godfathers”, Lansky, along with Charles Luciano, was responsible for the development of The Commission, the governing body of the Mafia in the U.S. It is also said that Lansky was responsible for Murder, Inc., a group that carried out murders for the crime families.

    ____________________________________________________

    Joseph Lanza
    Joseph Lanza

    Mug Shot

    Joseph A. “Socks” Lanza (1904-October 11, 1968) was a member of the Genovese crime family and head of the Local 359 United Seafood Workers union. He was convicted of labor racketeering and later for extortion, which he was sentenced seven to 10 years in prison.

    ___________________________________________________

    Phillip Leonetti
    Phillip Leonetti

    Mug Shot

    Phillip Leonetti (b. March 27, 1953) seemed to pattern his life after his uncle, Philadelphia crime family boss Nicodemo Scarfo. In the 1980s, Leonetti was moving through the family crime ranks as a mob hitman, capo and then underboss to Scarfo.

    After receiving a 55-year prison sentence in 1988 on murder and racketeering charges, Leonetti decided to work with the federal government as an informant. His testimony resulted in the convictions of high-ranking mobsters including John Gotti. In return for his cooperation he was released from prison after serving only five years.

    ___________________________________________________

    Samuel Levine
    Samuel Levine

    Mug Shot

    Samuel “Red” Levine (b. 1903) was member of the Mafia gang, Murder, Inc., a notorious group created to carry out murders for the Mafia. Levine’s list of victims included Joe “The Boss” Masseria, Albert “Mad Hatter” Anastasia and Benjamin “Bugsy” Siegel

    ___________________________________________________

    Charles Luciano
    Charles Luciano

    Mug Shots

    Charles “Lucky” Luciano (born Salvatore Lucania) (November 24, 1897 – January 26, 1962) was a Sicilian-American mobster who grew to be one of the most powerful men in organized crime. To this day his influence over the gangster activity in the U.S. still exists.

    He was the first person to challenge the “old Mafia” by breaking through ethnic barriers and creating a network of gangs, which made up the national crime syndicate and controlled organized crime long past his death.

    ___________________________________________________

    Ignazio Lupo
    Ignazio Lupo

    Mug Shot

    Ignazio Lupo (March 19, 1877 – Jan. 13, 1947) became a powerful and dangerous crime leader in the early-1900s and is known for being responsible for organizing and setting up Mafia leadership in New York. He has been credited with running one of the most notorious Black Hand extortion gangs, but lost most of his power after being convicted on counterfeiting charges.

    ___________________________________________________

    Vincent Mangano
    Vincent Mangano

    Mug Shot

    Vincent Mangano (March 28, 1888 – April 19, 1951) got his start with the Mafia controlling the Brooklyn docks for The D’Aquila crime family in the 1920s. After crime boss Toto D’Aquila was killed and the Commission was formed, Lucky Luciano appointed Mangano as the boss of the D’Aquila family along with allowing him to serve on the Commission.

    Mangano and his underboss, Albert “Mad Hatter” Anastasia, clashed regularly over how the family business should run. This led to Mangano’s demise, and in 1951 he disappeared and his younger rival, Anastasia, took over the family.

    ___________________________________________________

    Giuseppe Masseria
    Giuseppe Masseria

    Mug Shot

    Giuseppe “Joe the Boss” Masseria (c. 1887–April 15, 1931) was the head crime boss of New York City during the 1920s until he was shot to death, seemingly on the orders of Charlie Luciano at a restaurant in Coney Island in 1931.

    ____________________________________________________

    Joseph C. Massino
    Joseph C. Massino

    Mug Shot

    Joseph C. Massino (January 10, 1943) dubbed by the media as The Last Don, was the head of the Bonanno crime family starting in 1993 until he was convicted in July 2004, of racketeering, murder, extortion and other similar crimes. To avoid the death penalty Massiono cooperated with investigators and recorded a coversation with his successor, Vincent Basciano, discussing Basciano’s plan to kill a prosecutor. He is currently serving two life sentences.

    ___________________________________________________

    Giuseppe Morello
    Giuseppe Morello

    Mug Shot

    Giuseppe Morello (May 2, 1867 – Aug. 15, 1930) came to the U.S. in the early 1900s and set up the Morello Mob, which specialized in counterfeiting until 1909 when Morello and several of his gang were arrested and sent to prison.

    Morello was released from prison in 1920 and returned to New York and became a powerful Mafia “boss of all bosses.” He made money for the family with Black Hand extortion and counterfeiting.

    Morello’s leadership style was considered too conservative by many of the up and coming Mafia players and in 1930 he was murdered.

    ____________________________________________________

    Bugsy SiegelBugsy Siegel

    Mug Shot

    Benjamin Siegel (February 28, 1906 – June 20, 1947) was a career gangster who dealt in gambling rackets, bootlegging, car theft and murder with childhood friend, Meyer Lansky, in what became known as the “Bug and Meyer” syndicate.

    In 1937 Siegal moved to Hollywood and enjoyed a lavish life, mingling in impressive Hollywood circles while continuing his illegal gambling activity. He invested heavily into building the Flamingo Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, with money borrowed from the mob. He was eventually shot and killed when he failed to turn a profit quickly enough and pay back the money.

    ___________________________________________________

    Ciro Terranova
    Ciro Terranova

    Mug Shot

    Ciro Terranova (1889-February 20, 1938) was a one time leader of the Morello crime family in New York. He earned a lot of money and his nickname “The Artichoke King” by controlling the produce in New York City. Terranova was also involved in narcotics, but managed to maintain good relations with corrupt New York police and politicians. By 1935, Charlie Luciano took over Terranova’s produce rackets, rendering Terranova financially bankrupt. He died from a stroke on Feb. 20, 1938.

    ___________________________________________________

    Joe Valachi
    Joe Valachi “Joe Cargo”

    Congressional Photo

    Joseph Michael Valachi was a member of Lucky Luciano’s crime family from the 1930s until 1959 when he was convicted on narcotics charges and sentenced to 15 years.

    In 1963, Valachi became a key witness for Arkansas Senator John L. McClellan’s congressional committee on organized crime. His testimony confirmed the existence of the Mafia and exposed the names of several members of the five New York crime families and gave graphic details of their criminal activities.

    In 1968, with author Peter Maas, he published his memoirs, The Valachi Papers, which was later turned into a movie starring Charles Bronson as Valachi.

    ___________________________________________________

    Earl Weiss
    Earl Weiss

    Mug Shot

    Earl Weiss served as boss of Chicago’s Irish-Jewish gang in 1924, but his rein was short lived. Weiss was shot on October 11, 1926, after refusing to make peace with the powerful Chicago gangster, Al Capone.

    ___________________________________________________

    Charlie Workman
    Charlie Workman “The Bug”

    Mug Shot

    Charlie (Charles) Workman was a hitman for Murder Inc. run by Louis Buchalter. Murder Inc., specialized in hiring killers for the Mafia. Workman’s “fame” came when he and another hitman, Mendy Weiss, shot Dutch Schultz and three of his top men on October 23, 1935. Schultz developed peritonitis from the rusty bullets the killers used. He died 22 hours after being shot. Workman eventually was found guilty of Schultz’s murder and spent 23 years in prison.

     
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